Speaker 1 You've come all the way from Africa to Jerusalem to enjoy the Passover festival with friends and family. You sleep in after the night's fun festivities, but in the morning, something's very wrong. Angry voices wake you up. The streets are filled with upset people. Is it a riot? An insurrection against the Romans? You and your family rush out to see what's going on. And there in the street, you see an absolutely exhausted man, bleeding from many wounds and carrying the cross. Horrified, you see Roman soldiers driving him toward Galgotha, the place of the skulls to be crucified. He has such kind eyes. And some of the people lining the streets are crying, distraught at what's happening to him. What did he do to deserve such horrible treatment? Speaker 1 He can barely walk. Suddenly, one of the Roman soldiers grabs you and commands you to carry the man's cross or else. Yes, this pilgrim is Simon of Cyrene, who gets the shock of his life when he's forced to carry Jesus's cross. How would we have felt coming into town for a celebration, only to suddenly be part of this horror? But at the same time, what a privilege to do something to ease the Savior's terrible burden. Now, crucifixion was a barbaric method of execution used by some ancient civilizations, which is what the enemies of Jesus intended for him. Though this was certainly a slow and painful way to die, what Jesus felt this day was actually far, far worse. In Gethsemane, he paid the ultimate price for our souls. But it wasn't finished there. The price still had to be paid in full. And here on the cross, the excruciating weight of Gethsemane would not only return, it would be intensified. But despite the immense pain, his thoughts are still focused on others. As we discover in the first of his seven recorded final statements. As the Roman soldiers gambled for his clothing, unwittingly fulfilling prophecy, Jesus says, Father, forgive them. Speaker 3 For they do not know what they are doing. Speaker 1 Now, he could have cursed these men or zip them or something. But no, instead he asks God to forgive the soldiers carrying out his execution. On either side of Jesus, two thieves are also being crucified. As the now gleeful Jewish leaders mock Jesus from below, one of the thieves joins in. Speaker 3 If you really are the Christ, then save yourself and us. Speaker 1 But the other thief immediately chastises the first. Speaker 3 Do you not fear God? We deserve punishment, but this man has done nothing wrong. Lord, remember me when you come into your kingdom. Today, you will be with me in paradise. Speaker 1 Again, even while being ridiculed, he gives hope to this sinner. Like the Thief, even though we aren't always rescued immediately from the consequences of our sins, Jesus gives us hope for a better future. Now, not everyone in the crowd is taunting Jesus. Heartbroken friends and family, including his mother, Mary, and the Apostle John, watch as the tragic events slowly unfold. Jesus speaks to them from the cross, asking John to adopt Mary as his own mother and take care of her after he is gone. Spiler alert, John would later be blessed to live on the earth until the second coming, meaning he's still alive and kicking today. Who better to take care of Jesus's mother than a man he knew would far outlive her? As the end draws near, a thick darkness spreads across the land from noon to 3 PM. Jesus has been on the cross for six horrible hours when he cries out. Speaker 3 My God, why have you forsaken me? Speaker 1 Jesus is shocked by this new and immense anguish, but this severe emotional pain of feeling totally cut off from his father was required by the atonement. So do we ever feel alone or abandoned in our darkest hours? Yeah, it's tough to put one foot in front of the other when we can't see any light at the end of the tunnel. But Jesus fully understands and can comfort us. Finally, his mission is finished. Only after knowing that all things were now accomplished, Jesus utters, I thirst. Is it any wonder he's thirsty? But instead of water, they gave him bitter vinegar mingled with gall on a sponge like plant called hissop. But their cruel joke has profound symbolism. Long before when the Israelites in Egypt painted their doors for protection against the destroying angel, they used his up as their brush. And his up is still eaten every Passover to remember the bitterness of captivity and sin. Here on the cross, he is not passed over. We are. Jesus, God's first born son, allowed the destroying angel of death and sin to pass over us. Speaker 3 It is finished. Father, into your hands I come. Comm my spirit. Speaker 1 The cross did not kill Jesus, nor the Romans, nor the corrupt leaders of the Jews. As the literal son of God, he chose to lay down his life and give up the ghost. Yes, at any moment in these horrible hours, he could have said, Stop, this is too much, and ended it. But he didn't. He endured to the end. And so, in addition to dying for us, he truly chose to live through it all for us. Now, in the Jewish culture, grieving fathers facing the death of a loved one shake and tear their clothes. Well, at the death of Jesus, the Earth itself shakes and the huge, thick 60 foot veil covering the temple's holy of Holies tears right down the middle. These are symbols of God's tremendous grief for his son. But the torn veil is also a symbol that the law is fulfilled. The gospel and priesthood are about to flood the Earth. See, in Bible times, only one high priest once a year could enter God's presence in the Holy of Holies on the day of Atonement. But today, all covenant keepers can go through the temple veil. What amazing grace. Jesus Christ was and is victorious. Speaker 1 He completed his mission to bridge the way back to the Father. Yes, our journey may feel terribly unfair and difficult sometimes, but he's gone before us. We can complete our missions powered by his teachings and love. In the world you will have tribulation, but be of good cheer. I have overcome the world. Almost 50 years ago, Living scriptures was founded to help everyone better understand and feel the power of God's Word. Who knew that today's Line Upon Line series would touch half a million lives every week? Season 4, The Glorious New Testament is in production, and you are invited to help us in this great cause by clicking the donation link below. And as our gift to you, anyone donating $10 per month also receives a living scripture streaming subscription. For a donation of $1,000 or more, our artists will give your likeness a cameo in one of our videos. Together, through the Gospel of Jesus Christ, we can make a lasting impact on countless people around the world. From all of us, thank you. And now, go read the scriptures for yourself.

Come Follow Me with Living Scriptures | It is Finished: The Crucifixion | Line Upon Line

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Always Remember Him

Matthew 27; Mark 15; Luke 23; John 19 | June 19-25

After Jesus suffered in the Garden of Gethsemane, soldiers came and arrested Him. He was taken to Pilate, the governor, to stand trial. Although Pilate could not find fault with Jesus, he took Jesus before the people. It was a tradition to set a prisoner free during Passover. Pilate asked the people if they would rather set Jesus free, or set another prisoner free. They called out to set the other prisoner free, and to crucify Jesus. To keep the peace, Pilate allowed Jesus to be crucified.

Jesus was mocked and scourged by the soldiers and people in the crowd. They gave Him a crown of thorns and whipped Him. Then He was forced to carry His heavy cross up the hill. As He hung on the cross, He said, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” When Jesus died, there were earthquakes, darkness, lightning and thunder for three hours. A centurion saw all this and said, “Truly this man was the Son of God.”

Jesus suffered all this as part of Heavenly Father’s plan. As part of our baptismal covenant, we promise that we will always remember Jesus, and all that He did for us. The sacrament is a special time where we renew our promise to always remember Him and keep His commandments.

Watch

Read and Discuss

Scripture

Luke 22:19

“And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.”

Questions

  • Why did Jesus suffer for us?
  • What can we learn from Jesus Christ about forgiveness in Luke 23:34?
  • How has learning about the Crucifixion strengthened our testimonies that Jesus is the “Son of God”?
  • What can we do during the sacrament to remember Jesus?
  • What can we do every day to “always remember” Jesus?

Quote

“We are commanded to remember the singular events of the mediation, Crucifixion, and the Atonement by partaking of the sacrament weekly. In the spirit of the sacramental prayers, we partake of the bread and water in remembrance of the body and the blood sacrificed for us, and we are to remember Him and keep His commandments so that we may always have His Spirit to be with us.” James E Faust

View past lessons & resources on our website.

More Resources

Activity

Don’t Forget to Remember

As a family, write down some of your favorite stories of Jesus. Explain that sometimes people used to tie a piece of string around a finger to remind them to do something. Help family members tie a little piece of string on one finger to help them remember Jesus Christ today.

Treat

Soft Pretzels

These yummy soft pretzels are tied in a knot just like the string on your finger. They are shaped like praying arms to remind us to take time to remember Jesus Christ. (If you’re short on time, you can heat soft pretzels found in the freezer section in your grocery store.)

Song

To Think About Jesus, Children’s Songbook page 71

 

You’ve come all the way from Africa to Jerusalem to enjoy the Passover festival with friends and family. You sleep in after the night’s fun festivities, but in the morning, something’s very wrong. Angry voices wake you up. The streets are filled with upset people. Is it a riot? An insurrection against the Romans? You and your family rush out to see what’s going on. And there in the street, you see an absolutely exhausted man, bleeding from many wounds and carrying the cross. Horrified, you see Roman soldiers driving him toward Galgotha, the place of the skulls to be crucified. He has such kind eyes. And some of the people lining the streets are crying, distraught at what’s happening to him. What did he do to deserve such horrible treatment?

Speaker 1
He can barely walk. Suddenly, one of the Roman soldiers grabs you and commands you to carry the man’s cross or else. Yes, this pilgrim is Simon of Cyrene, who gets the shock of his life when he’s forced to carry Jesus’s cross. How would we have felt coming into town for a celebration, only to suddenly be part of this horror? But at the same time, what a privilege to do something to ease the Savior’s terrible burden. Now, crucifixion was a barbaric method of execution used by some ancient civilizations, which is what the enemies of Jesus intended for him. Though this was certainly a slow and painful way to die, what Jesus felt this day was actually far, far worse. In Gethsemane, he paid the ultimate price for our souls. But it wasn’t finished there. The price still had to be paid in full. And here on the cross, the excruciating weight of Gethsemane would not only return, it would be intensified. But despite the immense pain, his thoughts are still focused on others. As we discover in the first of his seven recorded final statements. As the Roman soldiers gambled for his clothing, unwittingly fulfilling prophecy, Jesus says, Father, forgive them.

Speaker 3
For they do not know what they are doing.

Speaker 1
Now, he could have cursed these men or zip them or something. But no, instead he asks God to forgive the soldiers carrying out his execution. On either side of Jesus, two thieves are also being crucified. As the now gleeful Jewish leaders mock Jesus from below, one of the thieves joins in.

Speaker 3
If you really are the Christ, then save yourself and us.

Speaker 1
But the other thief immediately chastises the first.

Speaker 3
Do you not fear God? We deserve punishment, but this man has done nothing wrong. Lord, remember me when you come into your kingdom. Today, you will be with me in paradise.

Speaker 1
Again, even while being ridiculed, he gives hope to this sinner. Like the Thief, even though we aren’t always rescued immediately from the consequences of our sins, Jesus gives us hope for a better future. Now, not everyone in the crowd is taunting Jesus. Heartbroken friends and family, including his mother, Mary, and the Apostle John, watch as the tragic events slowly unfold. Jesus speaks to them from the cross, asking John to adopt Mary as his own mother and take care of her after he is gone. Spiler alert, John would later be blessed to live on the earth until the second coming, meaning he’s still alive and kicking today. Who better to take care of Jesus’s mother than a man he knew would far outlive her? As the end draws near, a thick darkness spreads across the land from noon to 3 PM. Jesus has been on the cross for six horrible hours when he cries out.

Speaker 3
My God, why have you forsaken me?

Speaker 1
Jesus is shocked by this new and immense anguish, but this severe emotional pain of feeling totally cut off from his father was required by the atonement. So do we ever feel alone or abandoned in our darkest hours? Yeah, it’s tough to put one foot in front of the other when we can’t see any light at the end of the tunnel. But Jesus fully understands and can comfort us. Finally, his mission is finished. Only after knowing that all things were now accomplished, Jesus utters, I thirst. Is it any wonder he’s thirsty? But instead of water, they gave him bitter vinegar mingled with gall on a sponge like plant called hissop. But their cruel joke has profound symbolism. Long before when the Israelites in Egypt painted their doors for protection against the destroying angel, they used his up as their brush. And his up is still eaten every Passover to remember the bitterness of captivity and sin. Here on the cross, he is not passed over. We are. Jesus, God’s first born son, allowed the destroying angel of death and sin to pass over us.

Speaker 3
It is finished. Father, into your hands I come. Comm my spirit.

Speaker 1
The cross did not kill Jesus, nor the Romans, nor the corrupt leaders of the Jews. As the literal son of God, he chose to lay down his life and give up the ghost. Yes, at any moment in these horrible hours, he could have said, Stop, this is too much, and ended it. But he didn’t. He endured to the end. And so, in addition to dying for us, he truly chose to live through it all for us. Now, in the Jewish culture, grieving fathers facing the death of a loved one shake and tear their clothes. Well, at the death of Jesus, the Earth itself shakes and the huge, thick 60 foot veil covering the temple’s holy of Holies tears right down the middle. These are symbols of God’s tremendous grief for his son. But the torn veil is also a symbol that the law is fulfilled. The gospel and priesthood are about to flood the Earth. See, in Bible times, only one high priest once a year could enter God’s presence in the Holy of Holies on the day of Atonement. But today, all covenant keepers can go through the temple veil. What amazing grace. Jesus Christ was and is victorious.

Speaker 1
He completed his mission to bridge the way back to the Father. Yes, our journey may feel terribly unfair and difficult sometimes, but he’s gone before us. We can complete our missions powered by his teachings and love. In the world you will have tribulation, but be of good cheer. I have overcome the world. Almost 50 years ago, Living scriptures was founded to help everyone better understand and feel the power of God’s Word. Who knew that today’s Line Upon Line series would touch half a million lives every week? Season 4, The Glorious New Testament is in production, and you are invited to help us in this great cause by clicking the donation link below. And as our gift to you, anyone donating $10 per month also receives a living scripture streaming subscription. For a donation of $1,000 or more, our artists will give your likeness a cameo in one of our videos. Together, through the Gospel of Jesus Christ, we can make a lasting impact on countless people around the world. From all of us, thank you. And now, go read the scriptures for yourself.


A Journey of Sacrifice: The Crucifixion of Jesus

Picture this: you’re in Jerusalem, amidst the Passover festivities, celebrating with friends and family. But suddenly, the atmosphere shifts. Angry voices fill the air, and confusion takes hold. What’s happening? As you rush outside, your eyes lock onto a weary man, bleeding and carrying a cross. It’s Jesus, the Savior. How did it come to this? What could he have done to deserve such a terrible fate?

Simon of Cyrene, a pilgrim like yourself, is unexpectedly pulled into this heart-wrenching scene. Ordered by a Roman soldier, he is forced to carry Jesus’s cross. Can you imagine the shock and horror? Yet, amidst the chaos, Simon is given the privilege of easing the burden on the Savior’s shoulders. Little did he know that crucifixion, a brutal method of execution, was just the beginning.

Gethsemane, where Jesus paid the ultimate price for our souls, was where it all began. But the full price was yet to be paid. On the cross, the weight of Gethsemane returned, intensified and excruciating. Despite the immense pain, Jesus’s thoughts remained focused on others. His first recorded final statement is a plea for forgiveness: “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.”

To either side of Jesus, two thieves were also being crucified. As the Jewish leaders mocked and taunted him from below, one of the thieves joined in, challenging Jesus to save himself and them if he truly was the Christ. But the other thief rebuked him, recognizing Jesus’s innocence and asking to be remembered when Jesus entered his kingdom. In this moment, Jesus offered hope to a sinner, teaching us that even in our darkest hours, he is there to comfort us.

Not everyone in the crowd taunted Jesus. Heartbroken friends and family, including his mother Mary and the Apostle John, watched as the tragic events unfolded. Jesus’s concern for his mother was evident, as he asked John to care for her after he was gone. John, the last living Apostle, would fulfill this request, showing the deep trust Jesus had in him. As the end drew near, darkness covered the land, symbolizing the immense grief God felt for his son.

Finally, Jesus’s mission was complete. He declared, “It is finished,” and willingly gave up his life. The Earth trembled, and the veil in the temple’s holy of Holies tore in two. These were signs of God’s grief and the fulfillment of the law. Through Jesus’s sacrifice, the way back to the Father was bridged. We may face unfair and difficult journeys, but Jesus has gone before us. He overcame the world so that we, too, can overcome.

So, my friends, let this story inspire and remind us of the power of sacrifice and love. Jesus’s crucifixion is not just a historical event; it is a testament to the lengths God will go to save and redeem us. As we face trials and tribulations, we can find solace in knowing that Jesus understands our pain and can bring us comfort. Let’s take a moment to reflect on this incredible act of love and the hope it brings to our lives.

Remember, the scriptures hold many more stories like this, waiting to be explored. So, go ahead, dive into the Word, and let it touch your heart.
 

 

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