VIDEO: The Reality of Post-mission Anxiety (Saints Unscripted)

VIDEO: The Reality of Post-mission Anxiety (Saints Unscripted)

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In this episode, Kaitlyn, David, and Justin talk about their experiences upon coming home from serving a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (otherwise known as the Mormon Church or LDS Church). They talk about the mental health challenges that sometimes occur upon returning home from a mission and how they were able to navigate such challenges. Kaitlyn talks about her heightened anxiety and how it took medical professionals to help her overcome such challenges.

 

If you’ve ever experienced mental health challenges that seem insurmountable, we encourage you to seek professional help, along with the help of God.

 

What advice do you have for those that may be struggling with some form of anxiety? Let us know your thoughts below!!

I haven’t served a mission, but I kind of relate with that stage of life after serving Straight after school I started working full time, started university while also serving as a Seminary teacher. It was so overwhelming at first because it was such a drastic change in my life, being only 19. Then I realized I was having a burnout and I think even anxiety. I feel like no one prepares you for being an adult. Even in church, we always say youth is the priority, and I agree, but what tends to happen it’s that YSA go forgotten when we are practically still kids and we don’t really now what we are doing in life, we really need a lot of support in that stage of life

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Every stage of life has its challenges. After my mission to Austria (more than 55 years ago) I was afraid I wouldn’t be able to speak English. It passed. Later, when I was married and had my fourth child, I was terribly anxious and jittery. Really on edge. I was changing the wiggly baby and became so frustrated that I threw the container of baby powder clear across the room. I suddenly realized, “Hey, this is post-partum depression!” I instantly felt better. Knowing that what you are feeling is normal, and will pass, is a huge help. Don’t miss out on wonderful experiences because of fear. I am still in contact with companions and members of the church from my mission. It has enriched my life immeasurably (so have my husband and all 6 of my children!) Remember to express thanks for every blessing.

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3

I went on a mission and had some very tough experiences that I never processed. After getting home I had severe depression and was in a very dark place. I wouldn’t be here today without a supportive wife, bishop and therapist. I’m glad to hear the church is starting a program to help missionaries transition after returning home. For years I’ve said they needed to do that and I think that’s a big reason why a lot of missionaries fall away from the church after they return.

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I did not experience post-mission anxiety. I got home on a Friday night. Within 12 hours I was at my old employer on Saturday morning getting my old job back and starting working again on Monday. Got very active in my ward and still gave away Books of Mormon to strangers on the street or gas station attendants for many, many years. I had heard about the post mission blues, but I knew I could avoid that by just being as active in life as I was as a full time missionary. In other words, keep up the intensity of doing things. They would just be different things. I think a lot of people who get post mission blues are ones who slow down once they get home. I never did slow down and so avoided that.

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1

I can’t imagine going into a mission and then being accustomed to it and heading home. I feel really bad for my wife, she had to learn how to drive in Los Angeles on her mission then after returned back to rural life.

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Thank you so much. This is helping me a bunch. I’m kind of in the spiraling stage right now. This has helped though. Thank you.

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I didn’t need a mission to get depression and anxiety; picked them up all in my own. 🤣🤣

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Great video! I served in the Rancagua Chile Mission 2005-2007. Post mission life was so rough at first. I don’t think it was mental health related. I feel like I lived the RM movie. My mission was so spiritual and coming home was hard not having anything solid to transition to. I forgot a lot of English words. I didn’t acclimate well to the North American diet when I got home, college plans fell through, finding a job was a struggle, but I did meet the most amazing woman and get married to her a little over a year later in the Nashville TN temple. We have a growing family now and I have a greater appreciation for the Savior and His Atonement.

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3

I think we could be a lot kinder to kids who dont complete their mission because it is not for them. I told my son if he served 6 months I would be totally proud of him. 2 years is too long.

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2013-2015 🇵🇭 and I am married with two boys, one is coming out this week, life is hard but God is Good all the time. 🙏

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I’m right there with you David; I also served in Mexico from 2010 to 2012.

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I never went on mission so I will never know what this feels like. Thanks for sharing.

For me, getting back from my mish (nyc 9/11) wasn’t a big deal. I just jumped right back into work and school. The hardest part was coming back to my family, the very next day my older sisters and cousins playing the quija board. I try to stop them but they dont listen, My family is not at all mormon although were all baptized mormon. I put on prince of egypt in the next room while they played. They played got all freaked out said we should have listened blah blah blah. transition to my families reality as opposed to the spiritual nourishment i recieved daily on my mish was the hardest part for me. I had to quickly let go of the mission experience to meld well with my family experience. They are juxtaposed and for my sanity and the wellness of the family i had to let the past be the past. However the mish is my rock its a solid foundation, go and serve man its the greatest experience u will have in ur life and it will serve u and ur own family well throughout ur life it is literally the rock you can build on. So that when the storms of life and the winds of hell blow in all their might u will be built on a solid foundation and when u are left standing the foundations of hell will shake before u. Go and get these people man teach them the light and life of the world. He will go before u be on ur right and ur left his angels round about to bear u up. I am baptizng my little girl this weekend and my apostate family are all offering support. What will become of my daughters example in following the lord and entering in at the straight gate, what that will be? 🤷‍♂️ We shall see. Best two years man hands down, dont miss it!

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I’m not virture signalling or judging or anything. But, I am surprised that anyone is suggesting going to therapy or taking medication for “post-mission anxiety.” I would encourage you to avoid these things. Adusting to civilian life after a mission can be difficult, but you can handle it.

Talking to people about Jesus, in my experience, causes a surge in the Spirit within you. It is more intoxicating than any drug or alcohol high I may have experimented with in college decades ago. Perhaps the solution is to stay on mission? There are plenty of people to talk to about Jesus around you every day, no matter where home is. You could even buy a t shirt that says “Let’s Talk About Jesus” and wear it all day every day so that those who want to talk about Jesus will be aware that you stand ready to converse with them.

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The Mormon who came to my house a lot just went to Japan

I don’t believe missionaries should speak on topics like marriage because they are unfamiliar with the topic. Leave out Jacob 2 in your discussions especially those who plan on not getting or have desires in remarriage. Case in point – The Lord commands that no man among the Nephites may have more than one wife. “If a man can not have one wife does then we need to ask if D&C 132 will ever be placed back in the practices of our church? No. Or was it only the teaching of our eternal father back then? With those of the likes of Solomon, and other Prophets of old? The Bible and the Book of Mormon teach that monogamy is God’s standard for marriage unless He declares otherwise (see 2 Samuel 12:7–8 and Jacob 2:27, 30). Following a revelation to Joseph Smith, the practice of plural marriage was instituted among Church members in the early 1840s

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